Everything you need to know about Vapor 2 Trinity Kit

V2 recently launched the vapor 2 Trinity Vaporizing Kit, which is a variable wattage mod that is capable of producing thicker vapor clouds. This kit is suitable for those who wish to try out a more advanced vaping device or simply in search of a good travel mod. V2 is popularly known for coming up with high quality products have caught on in the Vaping industry and have so far launched many product that those who are fond of vaping can enjoy. The new one allows you to either choose from PG or VG liquids.

Key Features

  • Tank Capacity: 2 ML
  • Battery life: 450 with puffs included
  • Charging : USB charger
  • Catridges cost: $16.95 per bottle
  • Starter Kit range: $89.95

Pros

  • Comes in a variable wattage
  • Inclusive of a USB charger
  • Simple to use

Cons

  • Available in only two colors (either black Or blue)
  • 2ml Tank Capacity
  • Capable of 40W only

 

vapor-2-trinity-kit-sizeThe Vapor 2 Trinity is available on the V2 website for only $89.95. It comes in two colors, either black or blue. The vapor 2 Trinity other features include;

  • 1 tank
  • 1 standard atomizer of 1.2ohm
  • 1 sub-ohm atomizer of 0.8ohm
  • I USB cord
  • 1 user manual

The tank of the device is strongly built to allow the use of different atomizers and minimize the possibility of leaks and spills. The standard atomizer has 1.2ohm, which is best suited for blending a variety of PG e-liquids. This blend will give you a better flavor from your e-liquids. The sub-ohm atomizer that comes in 0.8ohm works perfectly with VG liquids that produce thick and bigger smoke clouds. If you are looking for even thicker and bigger clouds, you can opt to purchase the other sub-ohm atomizer at 0.5ohm. You can find it on the V2 website with its price clearly indicated. The device also allows you to customize the temperature and voltage to your liking, creating an optimal vaporizing environment for your preferred e-liquid.

Looks and design

vapor-2-trinity-kit-designThe device has an smooth and sleek outer design. The black looks great while the blue color looks extremely vibrant. The outer coating of the device is elegant and will perfectly fit in your hand. To top it up, the device features an OLED screen that will clearly show you the battery level, resistance, voltage and the level of Wattage. It will also allow you to change the output of the device to anywhere between 5-40 Watts. This will generally allow you to change your vaping experience according to your preference. It also has a micro-USB port located at the face of the device that will allow you to quickly and easily charge it. The fire button is extremely comfortable to use. The vapor 2 Trinity has a super-bright display that will enable you to read the battery level even if exposed to direct sunlight.

Check Out The Trinity Vaporizer on the V2 website.

Compatibility

The Vapor 2 Trinity Vaporizer is compatible with a large variety of e-liquids, giving you a wide range of options to choose from including PG and VG blends. Apart from V2 offering their own e-liquids blends, they also carry XEO, cosmic fog, vape bartender, Charlie’s chalk dust,ripe vapes,black note, mylk, zig-zag and vapor 2 e-liquids as well.

If you are planning on going with the PG e-liquids, it is recommendable you use the atomizer that measures in at 1.2ohms. If you want something that will give you bigger and thicker clouds of smoke, the VG liquids with the 0.8ohm atomizer will get you what you are looking for. V2 also offers a 0.5ohm atomizer that is sold separately. The tank comes with a convenient top-fill design, which will ease up the entire process of re-filling your tank with e-liquids. The tank has a 2ml capacity, a fair amount that will keep you vaping for a long time before having to re-fill again.

 

The V2 Vaporizing Kit is extremely impressive with its easy-to-use feature and offers smooth and flavorful hits with every puff. The limitation of only two available colors is however one of the cons of the device. The 2ml tank is sufficient but not enough for those who want longer vaping moments. All in all, the device will satisfy those looking for something that will see them produce thicker and bigger smoke clouds.Whenever you go out for a vaping device,always make sure to consider the general feel and avoid using price as the only determinant for purchase.

Purpose

The Training Institute is a multi-disciplinary training and education program. Its primary purpose is to provide opportunities for professionals working in tobacco use prevention to access current in-depth information; engage in skill-building techniques about a variety of policy, management, and program issues; and foster linkages between tobacco use prevention practitioners and researchers. The Training Institute promotes interactive, adult-centered teaching and emphasizes dissemination of intervention models with applicability to participants’ home settings. The courses taught reflect a comprehensive, environmental approach to tobacco use prevention and reduction and are taught by faculty with practical and/or academic expertise in the field.

Sponsors

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in collaboration with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Office on Smoking and Health. We would also like to thank all the staff at SmokeTastic, who help users find the best electronic cigarette in order for them to quit smoking.

Target Audience

The Training Institute is designed for professionals involved in learning, teaching, or practicing a public health approach to tobacco use prevention and reduction. It will be of particular interest to professionals in health departments, voluntary health agencies, coalition members, community-based health organizations, and individuals affiliated with national tobacco use prevention efforts will also find the Training Institute of benefit.

Courses provide entry-level instruction in specific topics and serve to enhance capacities of both new or experienced public health professionals.

Love Healthy – Live Healthy

Its OK!

You’re worthy; there’s nothing you must do apart from being you.

Kids are sacred; nurture them with more love, love then some more love. Love is development nourishment. Household is actually a team-work, parenting is the main occupation within the world; parenthood is the sole real chance to be a saint, it is love instigation work.

Children’s knowledge is overlooked as opposed to extracted in a school system which concentrates more on compliance than instruction. To study the most in life you must follow your own fire, your own interest that isn’t simple as school definitely will attempt to heal you of any opinion of a life of your choosing, until at least graduation… If you cannot escape school be inquisitive

The way you parent can alter the planet, join with your kids and consistently practice good parenting. Family could be any constellation and in case you need to make it a family, do. Love is limitless. Make it your own daily exercise to embrace and love squeeze rather than punishing and making use of the power over edge.

Make friends with death, discuss openly and candidly about this normal transition in life. It is not failing, it is just a continuation of life. Care for your sexual-health in addition to your physical and mental health, sex is actually a creative energy of delight and new ideas.

Its Your Life

kids 1Choice is actually a human right, so maintain it entirely from childbirth, by being daring, by being hard. Because the beginning of life was created to allow you to adapt, to fit in this can not be simple. Being oneself completely is an action of bravery as instead of aid the way to become who you are really you must make do with socialization that does not have any empathy for differentness no-tolerance for people standing out.

Empathy, pardon, gratefulness and laughter are the wealth of life, money also, however it is an energy that must go, not be hoarded.

Permit yourself to locate your own spiritual source, and when it is cosmic love rather than a deity, fuel up.

Wellness – DIY

First, think about the subject. What’s wellness anyway? Is health just diet and exercise? Or perhaps a blend of how our daily actions affect the surroundings, and hence our well-being?

vegge 3Consider what kind of soil the food originates from. Most farming now is nutrient-deprived and load with pesticides, fertilizers and compounds, consequently the products are somewhat more dirty and have way fewer essential nutrients inside them. You’re supporting a better trigger to your health as well as the surroundings whenever you buy better products. Help your neighborhood and take a look at your own neighborhood farmers market for fresh fruits and vegetables.

Would you ever wonder where the food originates from? How carefully would you see the ingredients? Being aware and careful what you purchase and where is crucial. The more you understand how your regular purchases affect your well-being, the higher your power to comprehend the truth and conquer the temptations of purchasing those things. Do you understand what a genetically-modified organism (GMO) is?

Visit www.nongmoproject.org to figure out. Beginning gardens may be the remedy to the outbreak and be self-sustaining.

Check-out www.rareseeds.com to learn to begin your garden.

vegge 1We are impacted by our everyday decisions to purchase products on an individual-level as well as the surroundings on a large-scale. It’s significant that people understand our function in how our regular purchases either lead to health or make us ill.

When thinking about the prospect of living a healthier, sustainable existence, it’s crucial that you consider a question: How do “I” create a change and lead to my well-being as well as the surroundings? Don’t Forget, each single time you buy a product you’re essentially casting a vote of acceptance for businesses to carry on their practices.

vegge 2Do you like and care for creatures’ well-being? Then consider where your meat and milk products actually come from. This isn’t to mention that one must quit eating meat or dairy, but being advised about where goods originate from and how a business treats its creatures is significant.

Stay Fit at Office

back painYou’ve made the choice to become fitter. You’ve registered for the gymnasium, swapped carbohydrates for carrots and altered your attitude. And then you sit-down all-day at your own desk and bite in the vending-machine.

But should we be getting guidance from a guy who offers his employees two hour lunch breaks, a free, highly nutritious two course meal, floor-to-ceiling windows along with a free 5,000sq meter gymnasium? We believe so – and so do over 6,000 businesses who’ve applied this program.

Where to Begin?

We spend a lot of our own lives at work, certainly our healthier lifestyle choices should be reflected by our environment – But where to begin? For your Life & Style group, the proverbial kick-up the back-side originated from Technogym. As producing fitness equipment, Technogym is a huge believer in ‘wellness like a lifestyle’. This means improving your own quality of life through a balanced diet, physical action along with a positive mental attitude.

ball 1

And utilizing Alessandri’s thoughts, Technogym provides workplace wellness deals at which business performs a makeover in your workplace.

Technogym senior master coach Grant Powles is really a consultan

‘We can tailor the bundle,’ states Powles. ‘That may suggest several wellness balls for employees to sit down to enhance stability and bearing, or perhaps a total redesign of work room.’t for your brand. His task would be to evaluate workplaces to learn how they really can enhance. ‘I look at the best way to bridge the gaps between an atmosphere where individuals are sedentary a substantial portion of the time as well as physical action,’ he says.

Although we’ve got a stereotype as it pertains to work out, Powles says it’s not about building-up a sweat in hip sports apparel, it’s just about utilizing the machines to encourage motion. ‘As we get old, we become inactive and we always must consider action.’

‘Inactivity throughout the afternoon indicates toxins build-up inside your s

ystem,’ states Powles. ‘If we could inspire movements at work to prevent these toxins accumulating, we’re successfully assisting your body keep a lot fitter lifestyle.’

However, what they provide isn’t cheap.

What It Feels Like

At Metro HQ, the most used device was the ball: intended to be utilized at your desks, these glossy, weighted balls definitely made us sit-up right. As we spent a lot of the day bouncing around, however these were also packages of enjoyment. Technogym promises the balls raise your torso motion by 66 percent. There’s also a QR-CODE to the handle in order to see types of workouts and sync it to your Outlook calendar so that it reminds you to really go.

ball 2

Being in the ball means that you work these muscles although you’re seated. Additionally, it means you raise your muscle stamina and consequently burn more calories.’

‘From a sports perspective, in case your pro-prioceptive control is functioning effectively, you may be 20 to 30 percent better. From the corporate perspective, if employees perform in a five-a-side soccer league, it may not really help you win the cup but it may assist with structural strength, which can prevent accidents and low back pain.’

However they did love the balance domes – it appears we’re only big children in mind. These activate raise something and your core muscles called control. ‘This is the joint movement and acceleration,’ states Powles. ‘It activates the little muscles that sit around your large muscles plus they assist with equilibrium. All the time, they’re inactive in a secure environment such as an office.

Therefore novices were advised to utilize the balls for only five minutes one hour, however, not everybody has great core strength. The bikes stayed fresh as staff couldn’t get accustomed to the notion of motion for its own benefit, rather than exercise.

A Better Life – Beginning

zen

I live a zen life of enormous joy, health and, quite honestly, ecstasy. And also you can have it also — today. It took me about 8 months to understand, however, I discovered the skills below just require dedication to achieve success and can be repeatable.

This only will reduce anxiety, tension and assist you to begin your day off right – – composed, centered and grounded within the current. It is been life-changing for me.

Eat meals. Mainly plants.

saladDiet and health is really a matter of having the most nutrients from the fewest calories. Grains for example millet, chia and quinoa and green crops like spinach, kale and broccoli supply the most nutritional advantage for the body. You do not have to torture yourself by removing sugar, fat or some of your other favorite foods.

Give Cash Away for Joy

giftPurchasing gifts for family and friends, volunteering and giving to charities faithfully makes people happier than investing the exact same money on themselves. Can you see exactly what this means? Our pursuit of the American Dream as well as pleasure is misguided. Joy is really a byproduct of assisting others, not buying stuff. In a nutshell, gifting and giving your time and money can make you somewhat happier than just shelling out for yourself.

Some More

Big benefits come from danger. This is not just about making tons of cash. It is about having enormous impact, developing the life of your own wishes and unchaining yourself from sensed roadblocks. Life hacking is about choosing the path of least resistance to achieving your individual targets. This plan is the recipe for spiritual, physical, psychological and psychological wellness. I follow this practice regular and am always having thoughts and new insights, feeling generally grounded, beneficial and glad, assured as well as joyful. This is actually a good thing you are able to do to help yourself now.

Make it your own mission to contact and receive a reply from the thought-leader, politician or chief executive you actually respect.

Do this weekend to something that you’ve been expecting to-do for years, but for different factors have delayed.

Ignore custom. Just because something is done a particular method for a very long time does not mean it’ll be like that permanently. Alter the rules. Be a paradigm that is changed by the spark.

Application Information

The Training Institute offers three instructional formats:

  • Ten full-length courses (15 class hours each).  Full classes meet Monday thru Friday.
  • Six mini-courses (10 to 12 class hours each).  Classes meet Monday thru Thursday.
  • Three Sunday pre-conference workshops (4 class hours each).

Participants can enroll in 1 or 2 full or mini courses.  Sunday workshops are not included in the maximum of 2 courses taken during the week.

  • If you want to take one course, you can choose either one full course OR one mini-course.
  • If you want to take two courses, you can choose one morning full course or mini-course
    AND one afternoon full course of mini-course. 
Acceptance Process

Because of the popularity of the Tobacco Use Prevention Training Institute and to ensure representation from all public health communities, with a mix of attendees from state, local and community health agencies, national tobacco prevention and advocacy organizations, and non-profit voluntary agencies, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office on Smoking and Health are requiring that the following application procedures be used for the 2001 Training Institute:

  • ADVANCED APPLICATIONS: Each state, territory, national network, and tribal support group funded through CDC’s National Tobacco Control Program is guaranteed three (3) class spaces. An additional 10 class spaces have been set aside for applicants designated by CDC-OSH. Completed applications for these ADVANCED spaces must be received no later than Friday, May 11, 2001. Notification of acceptance to ADVANCED spaces will begin Monday, May 14, 2001.
  • GENERAL APPLICATIONS: After spaces for advanced applicants have been filled (May 14, 2001), all remaining applications will be reviewed by CDC-OSH and UNC, and additional applications will be accepted. Every effort will be made to ensure representation from all public health communities as defined above. Completed applications for these GENERAL spaces must be received no later than Friday, June 29, 2001. Notification of acceptance to the GENERAL class spaces in the Training Institute will begin Friday, June 8, 2001.
Application Information

Enrollment in the Training Institute is limited to 30 participants in each of the 10 full courses and 6 mini-courses offered.

  • The Application must be completed in its entirety, including satisfactory payment arrangements, as outlined below. Incomplete Applications will not be processed. 
  • A fully completed Application should indicate a 1st and 2nd choice of courses desired.
  • Web site registration is available at www.tupti.org. A credit card is not required to register on-line. Applications will also be accepted by mail or by fax. 
  • Tuition rates for each course, mini-course, and workshop are listed on the Application Form. Tuition rates include all class materials and breaks.
  • The following methods of payment for tuition and fees will be accepted and must be indicated on or attached to the completed Application Form before the Application will be stamped as received:(a)  Personal check, money order, or certified funds (payable to UNC-CH)(b)  Agency check (payable to UNC-CH). The Federal Tax ID No. is 56-6001393.

    (c)  MasterCard or VISA

    (d)  Agency purchase order number (with copy of the purchase order attached)

    (e)  Letter (on agency letterhead) from supervisor and/or accounting personnel verifying that the agency check or the agency purchase order number is being processed and the projected processing time. A copy of any interoffice form or paperwork necessary to request a check or a purchase order should be attached to the letter if possible.

Submitting an application does not guarantee placement in courses at the Training Institute. You are encouraged to not make airline reservations until you have received a confirmation from the Training Institute office that you have been accepted as a participant. Notification of acceptance of your application to the Training Institute will be forwarded in ample time to take advantage of travel discounts.

Full Course Descriptions

#150 and #250  Youth and Tobacco Use Prevention  (15 hours)

Participants will learn how to design and implement programs that tap youths’ potential for leadership and involvement in reducing the attractiveness of tobacco, as well as their access to tobacco products. The course will use an integrated training format based on current research, interactive activities, and practice sessions. Effective interventions will be highlighted including those that train youth in advocacy efforts, empower youth to resist tobacco use, involve family and community in prevention efforts, and promote cultural diversity. Other topics will include school/community partnerships and other forms of tobacco use.

Sue Heitman, MSW, Health Education Coordinator, Yolo County Health Department, Woodland, California.

Patricia Jensen, MPH, Project Coordinator, Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Palo Alto, California.

#160  Program Management:  The Essentials  (15 hours)

This course is designed to give tobacco control managers the skills and knowledge to develop and maintain effective programs based on the four National Tobacco Control Program goals. Through both interactive and practical sessions, the course will cover the basics of strategic planning, infrastructure development, program management, collaboration, community mobilization, technical assistance, and media advocacy activities. As a result, participants will broaden their insight into and expand their tools for building state and local partnerships, funding local programs, training key stakeholders, fostering population-based changes, and enhancing relationships with multi-cultural and diverse population groups. Special emphasis will be given to the components that make programs successful including community intervention, counter-marketing, policy/regulation, and surveillance/evaluation. This course is best suited for individuals who have managed state, local, or community-based tobacco control programs for less than two years.

Lawrence Carter, Jr., MS, Project Director, Tobacco Use Prevention Unit, Maryland State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Patty McLean, MEd, Program Consultant, Program Services Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office on Smoking and Health.

#170  Tobacco Use Prevention Strategies for Diverse Communities  (15 hours)

This course is designed to enhance participant’s understanding, knowledge and skills in working with ethnically and culturally diverse communities on tobacco use prevention and reduction activities. Participants will be offered a basic understanding of cultural considerations that can be effectively developed and incorporated into unique prevention initiatives. Information will be shared about how to plan, implement, and evaluate culturally competent programs and policies which may eliminate disparities related to tobacco use among diverse populations. Participants will receive an orientation to comprehensive environmental strategies and examine the role and impact of tobacco within each ethnic group from cultural, historical, and epidemiological perspectives, using case studies to highlight those unique approaches. Using case studies to highlight and present unique approaches to prevention strategies, this year’s curriculum will be expanded to include issues relevant to all ethnic populations as well as subgroups within the primary populations. Those groups will include Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transsexuals (GLBT) and individuals from lower socioeconomic status (LSES).

Alvina Bey Bennett, RN, is a Senior Advisor and Public Policy Consultant specializing in program development and prevention initiatives for diverse populations, Glen Allen, Virginia.

Kerri Lopez, Project Director, Native American Rehabilitation Association/Northwest Indian Health Clinic; State of Oregon American Indian Tobacco Project; National Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program, Portland, Oregon.

#180  Tobacco Use Epidemiology and Surveillance  (15 hours)

This course provides information on the application of epidemiologic methods to tobacco use prevention and reduction. Participants will become knowledgeable of the basic principles of epidemiology as applied to tobacco, elements of a tobacco use surveillance system, data sources, methods to monitor trends in tobacco use, techniques to conduct primary data collection, and use of the computer and the Internet to assist in tobacco use prevention efforts. The course format emphasizes the application of learned skills to the practical needs of participants. This is an introductory course.

Gary A. Giovino, PhD, Senior Research Scientist, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.

Andrew Hyland, PhD, Research Scientist, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.

#190  Successful Practices for Designing Comprehensive State and Local Programs in Tobacco Use Prevention and Reduction  (15 hours)

State and local tobacco use prevention programs are faced with new challenges in the post-settlement environment: changing relationships with funding and technical assistance sources, planning for the expenditure of new funds, and contracting with community and public health organizations. In this highly interactive setting, participants will learn how to justify the relative allocation of resources within a comprehensive tobacco use prevention program. Key elements of state infrastructure, statewide projects, school programs, community initiatives, media campaigns, incorporating issues of diversity and identifying and reducing disparities among ethnic, racial, and special populations, as well as surveillance and evaluation will be reviewed. Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to: (1) list the basic elements of comprehensive state and local tobacco use prevention and reduction programs; (2) describe the relationship of adequate state and local infrastructure to successful implementation of a comprehensive program, (3) describe how to better integrate local policy advocacy action in context of state policies; (4) develop strategies to avoid the pitfalls of competing priorities; (5) describe strategies for protecting resources; (6) describe lessons learned from the experiences of states that have planned and implemented programs with excise tax or settlement funds, and (7) describe the trends and justification for resource allocation based on state and local experience and scientific evidence.

Deborah Borbely, MPH, CHES, Program Consultant, Program Services Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office on Smoking and Health.

Walter “Snip” Young, MA, President, Advanced Health Directions, Denver, Colorado.

#260  Clean Indoor Air Policies  (15 hours)

Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure is a public health problem throughout the United States and in many other countries. This course will emphasize interactive, skill-building exercises with presenters who have worked on the development, passage, implementation, and enforcement of clean indoor air policy. Participants will develop a comprehensive understanding of strategies used to develop and implement effective clean indoor air policies at state and local levels. Case studies will be used to illustrate effective communication strategies about ETS which involve communities, policy makers, municipal governments, the media, and the business community. Topics will include a review a of model smoke-free regulations and policies and state preemption issues. Strategies related to identifying and eliminating disparities between population groups and including diverse communities in efforts to promote clean air policies will be integrated throughout the course.

Lori J. Fresina, MA, Director of Government Affairs, American Cancer Society, New England Division, Boston, Massachusetts.

Jim Harrington, MS, Tobacco Prevention Coordinator, Marquette County Health Department, Negaunee, Michigan.

#270  Strategic Use Of Media  (15 hours)

State tobacco programs are challenged to make the best use of media to accomplish their program goals. This course provides skills and methodologies for planning, implementing, and evaluating media. Focusing on earned (free) media and media advocacy, the course will explore ways to integrate media into a comprehensive program to support policy goals, public education, and community mobilization. Development of paid media campaigns will be given minimal attention. Interactive methods will be used to share case studies, best practices and strategies from state and local tobacco programs and coalitions, advocacy groups, and media experts. Development of media advocacy strategies for reaching disparate populations and culturally diverse communities will be addressed. Information will also be provided on how to share media tactics with others in the tobacco use prevention movement.

Ann Houston, BA, CHES, Director, Public Education and Communication, Tobacco Prevention and Control Branch, North Carolina Department of Health & Human Services.

Dianne May, MA, MPH, Program Consultant, Program Services Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office on Smoking and Health.

#280  Evaluating Tobacco Use Prevention and Reduction Programs  (15 hours)

As demands for tobacco control program accountability increase, skill in program evaluation becomes critically important. This course is an introduction to concepts and methods for assessing program effectiveness, demonstrating accountability to diverse stakeholders, and communicating findings to policy makers and the public. Course content provides a practical framework for understanding process and outcome evaluation across recommended National Tobacco Control Program goals. Participants will learn how to: (1) use the CDC Recommended Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health to inform evaluation planning and implementation; (2) identify constituents, partners, and resources available for evaluating tobacco programs; (3) develop and monitor process, short-term, intermediate and long-term objectives; (4) identify existing data sources to obtain information from health-related data systems and other sources, including program and policy indicators, in order to supplement evaluation; (5) design and implement comprehensive evaluation plans, as well as evaluation activities specific to community-based program efforts and paid media efforts, and (6) address issues linked to the disproportionate health effects of tobacco use among ethnic, racial, and disparate populations. Participants will gain practical knowledge of program evaluation via hands on exercises in logic modeling, case studies, expert panel presentations, group discussions, and supplementary handout materials. The course is designed for individuals with a limited background in research methods.

Goldie MacDonald, PhD, Medical Sociologist, Epidemiology Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office on Smoking and Health.

Barbara Pizacani, MPH, Epidemiologist, Tobacco Prevention and Education Program, Oregon Health Division.

#290  Building and Sustaining Effective Partnerships for Tobacco Prevention  (15 hours)

This course focuses on the art of building and sustaining local and statewide partnerships to prevent and reduce tobacco use. A diagnostic approach will be used to assess the strengths of current partnerships while building skills to make them more effective. Presenters and participants will share innovative and successful strategies that address specific program components such as partnering with tobacco growers, involving youth in prevention strategies, and working with new or unusual partners to create policy change. Specific resources such as CDC’s Framework for Program Evaluation and University of Kansas’ Community Toolbox web site will be featured. Challenging aspects of coalition work such as turf battles, conflict, recruitment, and diverse representation will be discussed in the context of solutions.

Fran Butterfoss, PhD, Associate Professor, Health Promotion, Center for Pediatric Research, Eastern Virginia Medical School.

Rebecca H. Reeve, PhD, CHES, Evaluation & Development Program Manager, IQ Health of Virginia, The University of Virginia Health Services Foundation.

#300  Survival Skills for Thriving in Changing Tobacco Environments  (12 hours)

How can tobacco control advocates thrive in the post-Tobacco Settlement era? How will the Supreme Court’s anticipated landmark decision over tobacco control affect your state and local programs? Staff from the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Resource Center will share first-hand experiences on how to tackle these questions and guide course participants in formulating their next steps. Participants will receive a comprehensive overview of the Tobacco Settlement Agreement, the Supreme Court’s pending decision, and the issues they raise for state and local tobacco control programs. Participants will learn, through interactive exercises, strategies for: (1) creating state-specific plans to obtain Master Settlement funds dedicated to tobacco control; (2) holding the tobacco industry accountable for promises made in the tobacco Master Settlement; (3) navigating recent court decisions, including the Supreme Court’s anticipated decision about tobacco advertising and youth access; (4) crafting and passing state and local tobacco control laws that are immune to industry challenges; (5) examining the FDA’s future role in regulating tobacco; and (6) producing guidebooks on tobacco control policies to educate public officials and gain public support. Inclusion of ethnically and racially diverse communities will be addressed in strategies to obtain and use settlement monies for youth access, advertising, and industry lobbying at state and local levels.

Christopher N. Banthin, JD, Staff Attorney, Tobacco Control Resource Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

Jacqueline Salcedo, JD, Staff Attorney and Project Director, Tobacco Control Resource Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

#310  Women and Tobacco  (10 hours)

Since the beginning of the twentieth century, the tobacco industry has tried to seduce women into using its deadly products by capitalizing on their genuine aspirations for equality, independence, and social success. Sadly, their effectiveness can be measured by the rise of tobacco-related morbidity and mortality among women, with lung cancer now surpassing breast cancer as the leading cancer cause of death for women, and smoking a significant contributing factor in cervical and vulvular cancers, coronary heart disease and stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and osteoporosis. Smoking and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke also have a range of profoundly negative effects on pregnancy outcome, and contribute to neonatal, pediatric and even adult illness and death among the offspring of smoking parents. This course will examine tobacco use by women from a variety of perspectives, including an analysis of tobacco industry marketing tactics, epidemiological data, gender-specific issues surrounding cessation, and strategies to support tobacco control initiatives for women on the local and national level. The goal of the course is to provide participants with the necessary resources to increase the capacity to develop and implement tobacco control programs and activities for women with applications for local, state, and regional programs.

Caryn Kauffman, RN, LICSW, CTTS, Project Coordinator, Women & Girls Tobacco Project, Institute for Health and Recovery, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Michele Williams, MPH, Program Consultant, Program Services Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office on Smoking and Health.

#320  Outsmarting the Tobacco Industry:  Counter-Marketing Strategies That Work  (10 hours)

Aggressive counter-marketing is a key component of a comprehensive tobacco prevention program. Counter-marketing activities include not only media campaigns and counter-advertising activities, but prevention strategies that respond to the post-Master Settlement Agreement marketing approach the industry uses, including: increased point-of-sale advertising and displays, marketing to vulnerable target populations such as young adults, women, minorities, and youth, and promotional activities and advertising that influence the social environment and industry corporate image. This course will include strategies on planning, implementing, and assessing a counter-marketing campaign, developing legislative and regulatory policy initiatives, and integrating counter-marketing activities into various components of a comprehensive tobacco prevention program. It will include analysis of industry marketing tactics, case studies and examples of what has worked and what hasn’t, and presentations from state tobacco programs on innovative counter-marketing strategies. Participants will acquire skills enabling them to initiate effective counter-marketing campaigns and policies in their state and local programs.

Linda A. Block, BA, MPH, Health Communications Specialist, Health Communications Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office on Smoking and Health.

Colleen Stevens, MSW, Chief, Media Campaign Unit, Tobacco Control Section, California Department of Health Services.

#400  Spit Tobacco, Cigars, and Alternative Tobacco Products  (10 hours)

There is an increasing concern in the public health community about the rise in the use of chew, dip, snuff, cigars, and imports such as bidis and kreteks, which nearly equal the use of spit among high school students as alternative ways to use tobacco. This mini-course will provide an overview of national trends in spit tobacco and alternative uses of tobacco among youth and adults from various ethnic groups and the addictive potential and health risks of regular use of these products. Descriptions of commonly used spit tobacco products, their marketing, and health effects will be reviewed. Examples of recent prevention and cessation strategies aimed at identifying and eliminating disparities among culturally, ethnically, racially, and age diverse groups will also be covered.

Herbert H. Severson, PhD, Senior Research Scientist, Oregon Research Institute.

Scott L. Tomar, DMD, DrPH, Division of Public Health Services and Research, University of Florida College of Dentistry.

#410  Cessation Programs at State and Local Levels  (10 hours)

This mini-course will provide the scientific foundation for integrating tobacco use cessation efforts into comprehensive strategies to reduce the prevalence and adverse health consequences of tobacco use. This will include state of the art information on the development of addiction and the factors that increase the severity of the addiction and the need for treatment. Practical applications of research findings will include individual and community based efforts to stimulate and enhance cessation activity. The importance of attending to diverse needs of smokers which may vary by gender, age, socio-economic status, and ethnic heritage will also be discussed. This course will be presented in an interactive style between faculty and participants to help cultivate skills in program development and to facilitate the exchange of knowledge and experience that many participants themselves will bring to course.

Jack Henningfield, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Vice President, Research and Health Policy, Pinney Associates, Bethesda, Maryland.

Corinne Husten, MD, MPH, Branch Chief, Epidemiology Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office on Smoking and Health.

#420  What One School Can Do: Building an Effective Tobacco Prevention Program  (10 hours)

This mini-course will guide participants through the development and implementation of a tobacco prevention program from a local school’s perspective. It is intended for those working in schools and those working with schools. Based on CDC’s “School Health Guidelines to Prevent Tobacco Use and Addiction” and “Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs,” topics will include (1) implementation and enforcement of tobacco-free school policy; (2) identification of effective curricula for tobacco use prevention; (3) engagement of family and community in tobacco use prevention; and (4) application of current information for tobacco use cessation for youth. Issues of disparities and diversity will be integrated through selected topics including media literacy and curriculum selections. Case studies and strategic planning will be utilized, and participants will be encouraged to share their experiences and ideas.

Jane Pritzl, Health Intervention Scientist, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Linda Crossett, Health Intervention Scientist, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

#500  Tobacco 101:  Hands On With Basics of Tobacco Prevention and Control at State and Local Levels  (4 hours)

This workshop is designed for those with minimal experience and knowledge of tobacco prevention and control but a burning desire to “hit the ground running.” Topics will include: Healthy People 2010 Tobacco Prevention goals, key principles and components of tobacco control, CDC national framework for tobacco prevention programs, using data for surveillance, elements of program evaluation, advocacy for policy initiatives, tobacco morbidity and mortality, issues and strategies in diversity and reducing disparities, and an outline of “best practices” for each of the essential components of a comprehensive tobacco prevention program. Participants will experience interactive learning strategies, hear from experienced state and local guest faculty, and receive materials and resources that can be adapted to their own tobacco prevention programs.

Darla Havlicek, Tobacco Initiative Advisor, HealthPartners, Center for Health Promotion, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Gerry Odisio, MPH, Tribal/Multicultural Programs Manager, Tobacco Prevention and Education Program, Oregon Health Division.

#510  Involuntary Exposure:  A Review of Successful Smoke-Free Homes Initiative   (4 hours)

Secondhand smoke is a serious health risk to all of us, but especially to children. Young children’s lungs are more susceptible to this exposure as it can seriously affect their development. Knowing this, most public places where children spend time have adopted smoke-free policies. Unfortunately, the place where children are most likely to be exposed to secondhand smoke is in their home. Fifteen million children each year are regularly exposed to secondhand smoke at home. This exposure leads to 150,000-300,000 cases of bronchitis and pneumonia each year, it worsens the symptoms of asthma, and even causes new cases of asthma. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has been working with many tobacco control programs across the country to develop initiatives to protect children in the home. Many of these initiatives ask families to take a pledge to keep their home smoke-free. This session will review some of the more successful initiatives to learn what has worked and how those programs can be incorporated into state and local tobacco prevention activities.

Simon McNabb, Environmental Specialist, Indoor Environment Division, US Environmental Protection Agency.

#520  Youth Access and Enforcement:  The Synar Requirement, Compliance Checks, and Merchant Education  (4 hours)

Effective enforcement to prevent youth access to tobacco is considered a best practice and an essential component for a comprehensive tobacco control plan. The Synar law requires each state to enforce minors’ access laws. How can state and local tobacco programs most effectively do this? How can local coalitions, partners, and youth groups become involved? In addition to covering the requirements of the Synar law, participants will be provided practical tools for the successful implementation of youth access interventions and strategies on developing, implementing, and evaluating youth access programs. Participants will walk away with best practices and lessons learned from various states and communities.

Scott Neal, Compliance Check Program Coordinator, Tobacco Prevention Program, Seattle & King County Health Public Health.

Jeff Ruscoe, MEd, Liaison to Oregon Statewide Tobacco Prevention and Education Program and Coordinator, Synar Program, Office of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs, Oregon Department of Human Services.

We All Agree: Exercise is Good!

Maintaining fitness requires huge motivation from individual to steadily run it along with other activities.

Best time to initiate it is the day start .The objective is to achieve optimum health level .To exercise daily help to maintain health level as well as it is helpful in weight control if integrated with controlled diet or reducing calorie intake in the daily routine.

Multiple studies in different cultures and economies for moderate health & fitness tells us, one should exercise daily minimum 15 minutes for physical and mental well being .

It Only Takes 15 Minutes

15 minutes exercise in daily routine has considerable impacts that can be gauged and monitored at individual level .Enhancing time will embrace one with more quality health and well being.

Walk if You Can Walk

The simple way of carrying out exercise/fitness activity is through walk or brisk walk, a normal walk that keeps you in movement without halt, is considerably good enough, its sounds good when you are aging, young guys can do much better for extended time.